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The ethical implications of genetic enhancement

Author: James Alexander Paul; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2013.
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2013
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Due to the exponential speed in which genetic technologies are progressing, it is of paramount importance that we being to explore the ethical of human genetic enhancement. The major objections to genetic enhancement in human beings fall under two categories: 1. that by altering the human genome we stand to destabilize human nature which is the origin of our human rights; and 2. tampering with the human genome is an  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: James Alexander Paul; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 872270538
Description: 74 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by James Alexander Paul.

Abstract:

Due to the exponential speed in which genetic technologies are progressing, it is of paramount importance that we being to explore the ethical of human genetic enhancement. The major objections to genetic enhancement in human beings fall under two categories: 1. that by altering the human genome we stand to destabilize human nature which is the origin of our human rights; and 2. tampering with the human genome is an act of hubris and stands to instill us with improper and socially harmful attitudes towards nature and each other. In this paper I will argue that these objections are untenable, and that the real concern that biotechnological enhancement imposes is that of two unintended social consequence, i.e. the widening of class divide and the purchase of "positional" genetic goods leading to collective action problems.
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