skip to content
Language and the assumed justifiability of war Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Language and the assumed justifiability of war

Author: Jonathan Paul Branch; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2012.
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2012
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
In the United States, Just War Theory has significantly impacted how the general public tends to think about war. Regardless of whether more recent wars have met the criteria of Just War Theory, the pervading assumption seems to be that war is permissible in certain cases and that a government necessarily reserves the right to use justified military force on a large scale. Duane Cady has coined the term "warism" to  Read more...
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan Paul Branch; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 868066879
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
ds 011414
Description: 53 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Jonathan Paul Branch.
Local System Bib Number:
System.Supplied@2014-01-15,11:33:12

Abstract:

In the United States, Just War Theory has significantly impacted how the general public tends to think about war. Regardless of whether more recent wars have met the criteria of Just War Theory, the pervading assumption seems to be that war is permissible in certain cases and that a government necessarily reserves the right to use justified military force on a large scale. Duane Cady has coined the term "warism" to describe the assumption that war is morally justifiable both in principle and often in fact. Furthermore, William Gay and others have shown how language is often manipulated during times of international conflict in order to justify a government's use of large-scale military action Euphemism and metaphor, for example, are frequently used to detract from the horrors of war and to present to the public pictures of the morally heroic United States rescuing defenseless victims of injustice. While much analysis has focused on how language is used to justify specific wars and acts of war, the aim of this thesis is to explore the relation of language to the warist assumption itself. Even during a relative absence of international conflict, individuals within the United States continue to take for granted that war in response to certain circumstances is morally acceptable, if not morally commendable. This project will address the extent to which language is instrumental in the development and maintenance of the warist assumption and will conclude with some considerations of how language instead might serve to undermine warism and contribute to a climate of genuine peace.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.