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School bullying and ideal theory : the role discourses of violence and nonviolence play in the preservation of hegemony Preview this item
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School bullying and ideal theory : the role discourses of violence and nonviolence play in the preservation of hegemony

Author: Bradley Alan Gray; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2013.
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2013
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
This thesis seeks to unsettle the associations many of us make between violence and badness on the one hand, and nonviolence and goodness on the other. Central to the argument that follows is Charles Mills's critique of ideal theory. Mills is highly critical of theorizing that abstracts away from reality by employing an exemplar or idealized model in order to explain what people should be like, how people should  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Bradley Alan Gray; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 875688723
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
ds 040414
Description: 65 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Bradley Alan Gray.
Local System Bib Number:
System.Supplied@2014-04-04,14:01:50

Abstract:

This thesis seeks to unsettle the associations many of us make between violence and badness on the one hand, and nonviolence and goodness on the other. Central to the argument that follows is Charles Mills's critique of ideal theory. Mills is highly critical of theorizing that abstracts away from reality by employing an exemplar or idealized model in order to explain what people should be like, how people should treat each other, and how society should be ordered. In the first part of this thesis, I will use Mills's critique of ideal theory to analyze an argument for why violence is bad. I will show how the argument assumes an idealized social ontology, is silent on the issue of oppression, and elides the real-world context in which violence actually occurs. In doing so, the argument successfully condemns personal violence but has nothing to say about institutional or structural violence. The second part of this thesis then looks at three nonviolent discourses within the context of school bullying: zero tolerance, proverbs such as "Two wrongs don't make a right" and "Turn the other cheek," and the response of a select group of academic psychologists to an incident in which a victim fought back. Like the aforementioned argument about why violence is bad, I will argue that these nonviolent discourses rely upon an idealized and decontextualized understanding of violence that ultimately serves the interests of hegemony.
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