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The voice that challenged a nation : Marian Anderson and the struggle for equal rights

Author: Russell Freedman
Publisher: New York : Clarion Books, ©2004.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : Elementary and junior high school : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In the mid-1930s, Marian Anderson was a famed vocalist who had been applauded by European royalty and welcomed at the White House. But, because of her race, she was denied the right to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. This is the story of her resulting involvement in the civil rights movement of the time. "A voice like yours," celebrated conductor Arturo Toscanini told contralto Marian Anderson, "is  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Juvenile materials
Juvenile literature
Biography
Biographies
Juvenile works
Biographie
Biography Juvenile literature
Named Person: Marian Anderson; Marian Anderson; Marian Anderson; Marian Anderson
Material Type: Biography, Elementary and junior high school, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Russell Freedman
ISBN: 0618159762 9780618159765
OCLC Number: 53797147
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
1 Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939 1 -- 2 Twenty-five Cents a Song 5 -- 3 A Voice in a Thousand 21 -- 4 Marian Fever 33 -- 5 Banned by the DAR 47 -- 6 Singing to the Nation 59 -- 7 Breaking Barriers 71 -- 8 "What I Had Was Singing" 91.
In the mid-1930s, Marian Anderson was a famed vocalist who had been applauded by European royalty and welcomed at the White House. But, because of her race, she was denied the right to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. This is the story of her resulting involvement in the civil rights movement of the time. "A voice like yours," celebrated conductor Arturo Toscanini told contralto Marian Anderson, "is heard once in a hundred years." This insightful account of the great African American vocalist considers her life and musical career in the context of the history of civil rights in this country. Drawing on Anderson's own writings and other contemporary accounts, Russell Freedman shows readers a singer pursuing her art despite the social constraints that limited the careers of black performers in the 1920s and 1930s. Though not a crusader or a spokesperson by nature, Marian Anderson came to stand for all black artists-and for all Americans of color-when, with the help of such prominent figures as Eleanor Roosevelt, she gave her landmark 1939 performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, which signaled the end of segregation in the arts.Carefully researched, expertly told, and profusely illustrated with contemporary photographs, here is a moving account of the life of a talented and determined artist who left her mark on musical and social history. Through her story, one of today's leading authors of nonfiction for young readers illuminates the social and political climate of the day and an important chapter in American history. Notes, bibliography, discography, index.
PromptCat
Awards: Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor, 2005.
Newbery Honor Book, 2005.
Description: 114 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Contents: Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939 --
Twenty-five cents a song --
A voice in a thousand --
Marian fever --
Banned by the DAR --
Singing to the nation --
Breaking barriers --
"What I had was singing."
Responsibility: by Russell Freedman.
Local System Bib Number:
.b23926892

Abstract:

In the mid-1930s, Marian Anderson was a famed vocalist who had been applauded by European royalty and welcomed at the White House. But, because of her race, she was denied the right to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. This is the story of her resulting involvement in the civil rights movement of the time. "A voice like yours," celebrated conductor Arturo Toscanini told contralto Marian Anderson, "is heard once in a hundred years." This insightful account of the great African American vocalist considers her life and musical career in the context of the history of civil rights in this country. Drawing on Anderson's own writings and other contemporary accounts, Russell Freedman shows readers a singer pursuing her art despite the social constraints that limited the careers of black performers in the 1920s and 1930s. Though not a crusader or a spokesperson by nature, Marian Anderson came to stand for all black artists-and for all Americans of color-when, with the help of such prominent figures as Eleanor Roosevelt, she gave her landmark 1939 performance on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, which signaled the end of segregation in the arts. Carefully researched, expertly told, and profusely illustrated with contemporary photographs, here is a moving account of the life of a talented and determined artist who left her mark on musical and social history. Through her story, one of today's leading authors of nonfiction for young readers illuminates the social and political climate of the day and an important chapter in American history. Notes, bibliography, discography, index.--
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