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Does evaluation of teaching lead to improvement of teaching?
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Does evaluation of teaching lead to improvement of teaching?

Author: Harry G Murray Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:International Journal for Academic Development, v2 n1 (May 1997): 8-23
Summary:
AbstractGiven the widespread use of student evaluation of teaching in North American colleges and universities, it is reasonable to ask whether student evaluation has accomplished one of its major intended outcomes, namely improvement of instructional quality. A review of research evidence from three independent sources (faculty surveys, field experiments and longitudinal comparisons) suggests that student  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Harry G Murray Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, Canada
ISSN:1360-144X
DOI: 10.1080/1360144970020102
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4902260476
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Abstract:

AbstractGiven the widespread use of student evaluation of teaching in North American colleges and universities, it is reasonable to ask whether student evaluation has accomplished one of its major intended outcomes, namely improvement of instructional quality. A review of research evidence from three independent sources (faculty surveys, field experiments and longitudinal comparisons) suggests that student evaluation does in fact contribute significantly to improvement of certain aspects of university teaching, particularly if evaluation is supplemented by expert consultation. Furthermore, there is no clear evidence that student evaluation has led to undesirable instructional side‐effects, such as grade inflation and entrenchment of traditional teaching methods.
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