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The Ethics of cosmetic dermatology

Author: Karen Elizabeth Scully; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2009.
Dissertation: M.S. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2009
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
The practice of dermatology is divided into two types: medical dermatology, which is the traditional practice caring for those patients with diseases of the skin, and cosmetic dermatology, which is a nontraditional practice involving surgical and nonsurgical means of enhancing appearance. There are dermatologists who practice one or the other or both types of dermatology. Medical dermatology is in the core of  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Karen Elizabeth Scully; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 841574580
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
The practice of dermatology is divided into two types: medical dermatology, which is the traditional practice caring for those patients with diseases of the skin, and cosmetic dermatology, which is a nontraditional practice involving surgical and nonsurgical means of enhancing appearance. There are dermatologists who practice one or the other or both types of dermatology. Medical dermatology is in the core of medical practice, because it adheres to the goals of the medical profession, which are the prevention of disease and injury, and promotion and maintenance of health. Cosmetic dermatology, on the other hand, may be considered to be in the periphery of medical practice, since it only weakly adheres to the goals of the medical profession. My thesis is a search to determine what real medicine is, and what my moral obligations are as a physician practicing cosmetic dermatology.I will argue that the dermatologist practicing exclusively cosmetic dermatology has moral obligations, which are over and above those of the medical dermatology practice, because the cosmetic practice is outside of traditional medicine, with its established moral obligations, and because the cosmetic dermatologist is performing potentially risky procedures on healthy patients.
Thesis (M.S.)--University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 2009.
JT
Description: 53 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Karen Elizabeth Scully.
Local System Bib Number:
.b27593575

Abstract:

The practice of dermatology is divided into two types: medical dermatology, which is the traditional practice caring for those patients with diseases of the skin, and cosmetic dermatology, which is a nontraditional practice involving surgical and nonsurgical means of enhancing appearance. There are dermatologists who practice one or the other or both types of dermatology. Medical dermatology is in the core of medical practice, because it adheres to the goals of the medical profession, which are the prevention of disease and injury, and promotion and maintenance of health. Cosmetic dermatology, on the other hand, may be considered to be in the periphery of medical practice, since it only weakly adheres to the goals of the medical profession. My thesis is a search to determine what real medicine is, and what my moral obligations are as a physician practicing cosmetic dermatology. I will argue that the dermatologist practicing exclusively cosmetic dermatology has moral obligations, which are over and above those of the medical dermatology practice, because the cosmetic practice is outside of traditional medicine, with its established moral obligations, and because the cosmetic dermatologist is performing potentially risky procedures on healthy patients.
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