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The Ethics of infertility : issues of access

Author: Megan Marie Rorie; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2011.
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2011
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
Due to a myriad of reasons, both "natural" and socially constructed, fertility is an important aspect of life for many women in our society. However, due to socioƠeconomic and cultural factors, more and more women are experiencing infertility. While the technology exists that would help many of these women in surpassing these obstacles in conceiving, those technologies are unfortunately not available to everyone.  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Megan Marie Rorie; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 841574708
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
Due to a myriad of reasons, both "natural" and socially constructed, fertility is an important aspect of life for many women in our society. However, due to socioƠeconomic and cultural factors, more and more women are experiencing infertility. While the technology exists that would help many of these women in surpassing these obstacles in conceiving, those technologies are unfortunately not available to everyone. For both cultural and economic reasons, infertility treatments are inaccessible to many people who could benefit from them. In this thesis, I will discuss the current conditions that create a need for broadened access to infertility treatments and general issues of access. Next, I will utilize John Rawls' Theory of Justice to make a positive moral argument in favor of increasing access to infertility treatments. I will explain how two primary components of his theory, the Veil of Ignorance and his concepts of distributive justice support greater equality in access to infertility services. Last, I will describe the possible application and implication of expanded access to these treatments. Given the socio-cultural significance of child-bearing and the unequal distribution of medical resources in this area, there is a real need for discussion of this topic and changes in our current system. In order to achieve equality and justice in this important area of health care, and in order to truly attain procreative freedom, we must broaden access to infertility treatments.
Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 2011.
JT
Description: 72 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Megan Marie Rorie.
Local System Bib Number:
.b31941448

Abstract:

Due to a myriad of reasons, both "natural" and socially constructed, fertility is an important aspect of life for many women in our society. However, due to socioƠeconomic and cultural factors, more and more women are experiencing infertility. While the technology exists that would help many of these women in surpassing these obstacles in conceiving, those technologies are unfortunately not available to everyone. For both cultural and economic reasons, infertility treatments are inaccessible to many people who could benefit from them. In this thesis, I will discuss the current conditions that create a need for broadened access to infertility treatments and general issues of access. Next, I will utilize John Rawls' Theory of Justice to make a positive moral argument in favor of increasing access to infertility treatments. I will explain how two primary components of his theory, the Veil of Ignorance and his concepts of distributive justice support greater equality in access to infertility services. Last, I will describe the possible application and implication of expanded access to these treatments. Given the socio-cultural significance of child-bearing and the unequal distribution of medical resources in this area, there is a real need for discussion of this topic and changes in our current system. In order to achieve equality and justice in this important area of health care, and in order to truly attain procreative freedom, we must broaden access to infertility treatments.
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