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Over-medicated children in America : the ethical implications of the use of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of behavioral issues and mental illness in children

Author: Leslie Renate Dean; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
Publisher: [2007]
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2007
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The point of this thesis is to give a brief account of the history of psychology, psychiatry, and pharmacology relative to the treatment of children, evaluate the use of pharmaceuticals as a standard of treatment in the field of child psychiatry, and explore the alternatives to medicating a child. The overall state of health and healthcare in the United States was revolutionized by the advances of pharmacology. The  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Leslie Renate Dean; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 841573989
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
The point of this thesis is to give a brief account of the history of psychology, psychiatry, and pharmacology relative to the treatment of children, evaluate the use of pharmaceuticals as a standard of treatment in the field of child psychiatry, and explore the alternatives to medicating a child. The overall state of health and healthcare in the United States was revolutionized by the advances of pharmacology. The social, legal, and ethical consequences of the use of prescription drugs to treat children with mental illnesses or disorders will also be considered. The differences between the physical and mental health of adults and young children must be taken into consideration as well as how pharmaceuticals promise to improve their conditions as presented to the parent and the young patient. Empirical evidence will be explored and utilized to evaluate whether the claim for pharmaceuticals mayor may not be justified in some cases. Mandated laws and policies are in place to prevent the wrongful distribution and misuse of prescription drugs, but the efficiency of these guidelines must be examined. The legitimacy and authority behind such laws and policies pertaining to child psychiatry must be questioned since they determine the regulations surrounding the distribution of pharmaceutical drugs in mental health. Conclusively, we must ask whether prescription drugs enhance the quality and longevity of the life of a child, and if they are worth the potential risks of their use. In addition to this, it must be asked whether all available alternatives have been considered before prescribing a chemically altering substance into a child's body for the treatment of behavioral issues.
Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 2007.
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Description: 50 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Other Titles: Ethical implications of the use of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of behavioral issues and mental illness in children
Responsibility: by Leslie Renate Dean.
Local System Bib Number:
.b24195042

Abstract:

The point of this thesis is to give a brief account of the history of psychology, psychiatry, and pharmacology relative to the treatment of children, evaluate the use of pharmaceuticals as a standard of treatment in the field of child psychiatry, and explore the alternatives to medicating a child. The overall state of health and healthcare in the United States was revolutionized by the advances of pharmacology. The social, legal, and ethical consequences of the use of prescription drugs to treat children with mental illnesses or disorders will also be considered. The differences between the physical and mental health of adults and young children must be taken into consideration as well as how pharmaceuticals promise to improve their conditions as presented to the parent and the young patient. Empirical evidence will be explored and utilized to evaluate whether the claim for pharmaceuticals mayor may not be justified in some cases. Mandated laws and policies are in place to prevent the wrongful distribution and misuse of prescription drugs, but the efficiency of these guidelines must be examined. The legitimacy and authority behind such laws and policies pertaining to child psychiatry must be questioned since they determine the regulations surrounding the distribution of pharmaceutical drugs in mental health. Conclusively, we must ask whether prescription drugs enhance the quality and longevity of the life of a child, and if they are worth the potential risks of their use. In addition to this, it must be asked whether all available alternatives have been considered before prescribing a chemically altering substance into a child's body for the treatment of behavioral issues.
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