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Tolerance in clinical bioethics : resolving issues of moral pluralism

Author: Katherine Lee Duncan; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
Publisher: ©2012.
Dissertation: M.A. University of North Carolina at Charlotte 2012
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Summary:
In this paper I argue for tolerance as a procedural solution to resolve issues of moral conflict in the clinical healthcare setting. The first half of the paper examines two popular theories in bioethics that are based on the premise that all people have shared moral beliefs. These theories are those of Beauchamp and Childress and Gert, Culver and Clouser. I argue that these theories are inadequate for several  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Katherine Lee Duncan; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Department of Philosophy.; University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Dept. of Philosophy.
OCLC Number: 841574715
Notes: UNC Charlotte Libraries notes:
In this paper I argue for tolerance as a procedural solution to resolve issues of moral conflict in the clinical healthcare setting. The first half of the paper examines two popular theories in bioethics that are based on the premise that all people have shared moral beliefs. These theories are those of Beauchamp and Childress and Gert, Culver and Clouser. I argue that these theories are inadequate for several reasons, which points to the reality of moral pluralism in clinical bioethics as opposed to a shared morality. The second half of the paper examines the proper understanding of tolerance and how tolerance is enacted through the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA). The proper understanding of tolerance is distinct from relativism or indifference. The PSDA places the burden of tolerance on the physician because it gives the patient the right to accept or refuse treatment options. However, there are some limits placed on the patient because some demands are regarded as intolerable. Finally, I examine the benefits and limits of tolerance in clinical healthcare, providing case studies to illustrate both.
Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 2012.
JT
Description: 47 leaves : illustrations ; 29 cm
Responsibility: by Katherine Lee Duncan.
Local System Bib Number:
.b32587703

Abstract:

In this paper I argue for tolerance as a procedural solution to resolve issues of moral conflict in the clinical healthcare setting. The first half of the paper examines two popular theories in bioethics that are based on the premise that all people have shared moral beliefs. These theories are those of Beauchamp and Childress and Gert, Culver and Clouser. I argue that these theories are inadequate for several reasons, which points to the reality of moral pluralism in clinical bioethics as opposed to a shared morality. The second half of the paper examines the proper understanding of tolerance and how tolerance is enacted through the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA). The proper understanding of tolerance is distinct from relativism or indifference. The PSDA places the burden of tolerance on the physician because it gives the patient the right to accept or refuse treatment options. However, there are some limits placed on the patient because some demands are regarded as intolerable. Finally, I examine the benefits and limits of tolerance in clinical healthcare, providing case studies to illustrate both.
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